Missiology

Intercultural Mutuality

Intercultural mutuality embraces a missional stance that looks beyond colonialism, post-colonialism, independence and even inter-dependence and partnership, as typically understood.

Intercultural mutuality implies a working relationship between people of different cultures, based upon a mutual inter-cultural appreciation and compatibility of gifts, talents, characteristics and culture—all of which is rooted in a shared, vocational commitment to serving God’s eternal purpose, the missio Dei.

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Discipleship

Spirituality

The great test of the validity and value of authentic spirituality is not how it fares amidst the affirmation and celebration of cultic community, nor in the isolation of physical separation from the world’s hustle and bustle. It is rather how it fares when brought right up alongside and against those places and systems and happenings and events and choices that the world-at-large finds irresistible and assumes are irreplaceable.

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Missiology

My father wanted me to become a rabbi, just as his father had wanted him to be. For the past 2000 years or so, any Orthodox Jew who wanted his son to become a rabbi would send him to a Hebrew School called a yeshiva, also called a bet hamidrash, a “house of research.” The name comes from the words bet, meaning “house” and doresh which means “to seek, ask, question or research.”

From the very first day in the yeshiva, our textbook was the Torah. Continue reading

Bet Hamidrash

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Missiology, review

Through the River

Through the River—Understanding Assumptions About Truth

Hirst, Hirst, and Hiebert 2009—200pp.

Through the River

A review.


Jon and Mindy Hirst present teachings absorbed by the authors from a book by Dr Paul Hiebert (1999), using a visual analogy, based upon three communities of people living in different ways around ‘River Town’. Each community lives by and depicts a particular epistemology—a ‘truth lens’—either positivism, instrumentalism and critical realism, respectively.

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Missiology

Christianity is not a religious option. It is a call to service.

What we think of as Christianity is a historic faith. A faith focused upon a story of stories, describing real, historic events that took place within the larger history of the world. And the objective reality, at the heart of all these stories, is the calling, the “election” of a people — firstly the Jews, then from amongst every ethnos, every tribe, people, language and nation (I.e. the Gentiles) — to serve God’s eternal purpose: the renewal of creation.

The People of God are called not for their own sakes, but for the sake of others. Pars pro toto. The few for the sake of the many. Salvation — that is, deliverance from evil and the corruption of the existing order of things — is given to this people, not to save them from this world, but to better fit them for it: to deliver them from the idolatry that beguiles the world and to form them into a representative community of practical, effectual agents of change!

To equip them, God gives his most precious gifts: the person of his Son, the Presence of his Spirit, that through the People of God, shalom may be established amongst human beings.

Christian faith, therefore, is not a religious option. It is a call to serve: to serve the eternal purpose of God. To belong to a great people, blessed to be a blessing to all the nations of the world and a harbinger of creational renewal. Anything less is short-changing God, the People of God and the peoples of the world.

Christianity is not a religious option

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